DAILY RICHMOND EXAMINER.

VOL. XIV.--NO. 324. RICHMOND, TUESDAY MORNING, APR. 10, 1862. PRICE TWO CENTS.


GENERALS BUCKNER AND TILGHMAN IN FORT WARREN--HOW THEY PASS THEIR TIME, AND WHAT THEY SAY.

The Boston Post furnishes a column or so of gossip about the life of Generals Buckner and Tilghman in Fort Warren. We make a few extracts:

Generals Buckner and Tilghman are the two greatest lions among us. Their residence is at Hotel de Warren, in Boston harbour. They room with Marshal Kane, and thus far, are quite satisfied with their accomodations. They talk and smoke, eat and drink, and read the Boston newspapers with great satisfaction.

The other day General Tilghman remarked to Marshal Keyes that he should like to see Bunker Hill, and said that if he was to be executed he should like be hanged from that spot. Your request cannot be allowed, said the under Marshal, "the ground upon which that monument was erected has been consecrated to freedom. General Warren fell there--it is no place for you." The Southern General did not pursue the conversation any further.

General Tilghman has been in Boston before, at which time he became acquainted with a lady, upon whom he must have made an impression, for she repaired to the fort the other day for the purpose of paying her addresses to him. As Colonel Dimmick allows no woman kind to enter his hotel, the lady aforesaid was compelled to postpone her devoirs for the present. He was also acquainted with Colonel Dimmick at the fort, and Marshal Kane, of Baltimore, who, he remarked, was an old "townie" of his.

Both Buckner and Tilghman censured Pillow for the loss of the army at Fort Donaldson. They contend that Floyd is a brave man. After the rebels had nearly succeeded in cutting a road through our forces out of the fort, as they say, Pillow recalled them, and they were followed in with great slaughter.

Buckner is evidently a "buck," and both together are jolly fellows. They are also philosophers. Buckner weighs two hundred and is a solidly built; Tilghman, light and of a nervous temperament. One of the most experienced of our policemen, who is well acquainted with the physiognomy of rogues, says that on the street he should take Buckner for a fighting man or a burglar; and that with his round, hard face, high cheek bones, small gray eyes, and heavy overbrows, his face is the exact counterpart of that of "Dumblin Tricks," the well known fighting man.


Daily Richmond Examiner, 10 April 1862.

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