SLIPS! SLIPS! WHERE ARE THE SLIPS?


CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION

I have tried to preserve the continuity and the look and feel of the Official Records within the limitations of my knowledge of html.


FORT WARREN, April 16, 1865.
Lieut. Gen. U.S. GRANT,
Commanding U.S. Army:

GENERAL: You will appreciate, I am sure, the sentiment which prompts me to drop you these lines. Of all the misfortunes which could befall the Southern people, or any Southern man, by far the greatest, in my judgement, would be the prevalence of the idea that theu could entertain any other feelings of unqualified abhorrence and indignation for the assassination of the President of the United States, and the attempt to assassinate the Secretary of State. No language can adequately express the shock produced upon myself, in common with all the other general officers confined here with me, by the occurrence of this appalling crime, and by the seeming tendency in the publc mind to connect the South and Southern men with it. Need we say that we are not assassins, nor the allies of assassins, be they from the North or the South, and that coming as we do from most of the States of the South we would be ashamed of our own people, were we not assured that they will reprobate this crime. Under the circumstances I could not refrain from some expression of my feelings. I thus utter them to a soldier who will comprehend them. The following officers, Maj. Gens. Ed. Johnson, of Virginia, and Kershaw, of South Carolina; Brigadier-Generals Barton, Corse, Hunton, and Jones, of Virginia; Du Bose, Simms, and H.R. Jackson, of Georgia; Frazer, of Alabama; Smith and Gordon, of Tennessee; Cabell, of Arkansas, and Marmaduke, of Missouri, and Commodore Tucker, of Virginia, all heartily concur with me in what I have said.

Respectfully, general,
R.S. EWELL,
Lieutenant-General, C.S. Army.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS FORT WARREN,
Boston Harbor, April 16, 1865.

Respectfully referred to Brig. Gen. William Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners.

The general officers confined at this post as prisoners of war have, from the moment of the reception of the news, expressed their regret for the loss of President Lincoln, and their utmost horror of the act and detestation of his murderers.

JOHN W.M. APPLETON,
Major First Battalion Heavy Artillery, Commanding Post.

(Forwarded by General Hoffman to General Grant.)


U.S. War Department, War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, 1880-1901), v. 46, Part 3, 787.

BACK TO EJOL UPLOADED: 10 JULY 1996 / UPDATED: 23 FEBRUARY 1998