DAILY DISPATCH.

VOL. XIX.--NO. 63. RICHMOND, VA., TUESDAY, JAN. 7, 1862. PRICE ONCE CENT.

MOVEMENTS OF TROOPS IN THE WEST.


INCURSIONS OF THE ENEMY.


NECESSITY OF PROMPT ACTION.


&c., &c., &c.


[SPECIAL CORRESPONDENCE OF THE DISPATCH]


LYNCHBURG, VA., Jan. 5, 1862.

Intelligence of undoubted character, which may possibly reach you in advance of my letter, has been received here from the forces under Gen. Johnston, at Camp Alleghany, to the effect that that camp has been abandoned, and that the command has retired to Monterey. This movement was brought about by apprehensions of being out flanked by the enemy, who had appeared in the neighborhood in very large force. The particulars of the retreat we have not received, but have it on undoubted authority that the Yankees have occupied Huntersville in large force--only a few miles distant from the camp at Alleghany, previously held by our forces.--Huntersville is only some thirty or forty miles from the Virginia Central Railroad, and it is greatly feared that, without prompt measures, trouble may arise in that quarter. In this connection, it may not be improper to allude to the threatening aspect of affairs--the encroachments of the vandals towards the Virginia and Tennessee road. Already have they been in force within sixty miles of this road, while they are continually depredating in the counties which have been evacuated by our forces, carrying destruction wherever they go. A large quantity of provisions, which was left at Peterstown by Floyd, it is feared, has fallen into their hands, or has been destroyed; as from latest accounts from that section they had been within a few miles of that place.

I might mention individual instances of insult, injury, and robbery committed on our citizens by these marauding parties, which have been related to me by persons recently from that section of country, but space forbids, and I hasten on; but allow me to state, before closing on this head, that from the information which reaches us every day from the section referred to, ten days will not elapse before the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad is blockaded, if a worse fate does not befall it. Prompt measures must be adopted by the Government, and what is done must be done immediately, if we are to be saved not only a vast deal of tronble [sic], expense, and inconvenience, but suffering as well. It is true, the "timely warning" has been previously sounded by the Dispatch and its correspondent from this section, and what I write on this topic may be stale, but the importance of the subject is so great that were it a thrice- told tale it should be repeated again and again, until heeded by the authorities, and the proper measures adopted for the defense of this most important line of communication.

An accident occurred on the Virginia and Tennessee Road last Friday night, between 12 and 1 o'clock, occasioned by the removal of a rail. The train was thrown from the track, but fortunately no one was injured, and very little damage resulted to the train, although being at a high rate of speed at the time of the occurrence. Fortunately for the passengers, the accident occurred near the residence of Gordon Kent, Esq., who sent conveyances and an invitation for all of them to make his house their home until the train was righted up so that they could pursue their journey. The invitation was accepted, and they all speak in terms of praise, and express grateful thanks for the handsome style in which they were so generously entertained.

With the usual allusion to the weather, which has been quite cold, as well as disagreeable, I throw aside my pen until occasion shall require it to be used again.

O.K.


Richmond Daily Dispatch, 7 January, 1862.

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