DAILY DISPATCH.

VOL. XIX.--NO. 63. RICHMOND, VA., SATURDAY, OCT. 12, 1861. PRICE ONCE CENT.

THE BATTLE OF GREENBRIER RIVER.


Interesting Particulars--The Strength of the Enemy--Gallantry of our troops--Cowardice of the Enemy, &c.


[SPECIAL CORRESPONDENCE OF THE DISPATCH]


CAMP BARTOW, GREENBRIER RIVER,
Pocahontas Co., Oct. 8, 1861.}

Doubtless you have received the details of the decided victory we gained over the enemy at this post on Thursday last, and I propose now to give you a few incidents of the battle:

THE ENEMY IN SIGHT.

About 7 o'clock our pickets, under command of Col. Ramsey, of the 1st Georgia regiment, discovering a large force of the enemy coming down the mountain, immediately firing into them, and held them in check for a long time, and then retreated in good order to camp. The enemy, finding that our pickets (about 200 men) behaved so bravely, fired into them with cannon--a most cowardly act, and one unheard of in civilized warfare.

The enemy then advanced to an open field, (7,000 strong,) placed six cannon in position, and commenced a rapid fire into our encampment, and, after receiving five or six rounds, Captain Shumaker opened on them with his battery, Captain Rice joining in with his pieces, and for four hours and a quarter an incessant cannonading was kept up. In the meantime the infantry of the enemy tried to outflank us on the left and right; but, to their surprise, they found that the Arkansans cursing that they would not come close enough for them to get a shot; on the right, they were equally surprised at finding the 1st and 12th Georgia regiments ready to receive them, and did not venture near them, although the Georgians told them they would not fire on them until they could get in the open field, the enemy then being in the woods and covered by trees.

The enemy retreated in double-quick time after they found they could not outflank us, leaving a large number of wounded and dead on the field. Our loss in this engagement was seven killed and missing, and twenty-one wounded. Their loss is estimated at between one and two hundred killed, and a large number wounded.

Great credit is due to Capts. Shumaker and Rice and their brave men, for the Gallant manner in which they handled their beautiful little pieces. We regret that Capt. Rice had his foot shot off, which had to be amputated. He is now improving slowly. We cannot particularize instances of bravery, but Capt. Rice acted "well his part." In fact, all the troops behaved with the utmost coolness and bravery.

CAPTURE OF THEIR FLAG.

The Arkansas regiment captured the "Stars and Stripes, " the flag of the enemy, a beautiful silk one, and brought it to camp. The staff had been shot off, and the flag has been sent to Richmond.

COLONEL RAMSEY.

Colonel Ramsey was in command of the pickets, and was cut off from them, after having his horse shot from under him, and, he being lame, was forced to take to the woods, and was in the rear of the enemy during the battle, and says he counted twenty- five wagons full of dead and wounded that passed by him, and that for a mile the road was covered with blood. Colonel Ramsey displayed great courage with his pickets, and they nobly sustained him in his efforts.

THE CHARGE.

During a portion of the battle, the enemy upon the right was called upon to charge on the Georgians by the commanding officer; but "nary" charge could be got out of them. The following dialogue was distinctly heard by our troops:

The Yankee officer to Colonel.--"Why in the h-ll don't you charge on them? Haven't you heard the order?

Colonel.--"Yes; but they won't do it, and I'll be d--d if I can. I can't carry them on my shoulders."

Man in the ranks.--"Pay us, and we will fight."

OUR HOSPITAL.

Before the fight was commenced a white flag was placed over a house containing a number of sick men; but, instead of humanely keeping their shot from, they fired incessantly at it, and one or two balls passed completely through the building, but luckily without hurting any one. Such cowardly conduct is in keeping with the miserable tool to whom they belong.

HORSE AND KITTEN.

During the cannonading, Col. Taliaferro's horse, a very fine bay, was tied by our entrenchments, and the old fellow being asleep, a bombshell bursted right over him; he merely raised his head, looked around, and then turned to his former position, as if in utter contempt of the parties from whence it came. A little kitten, belonging to a company of the 23d, during the engagement, was seen running along the entrenchments, and whenever a ball struck near it and raised the dirt, the little thing would jump and gambol around it in playful glee.

THE WOUNDED.

I cannot give you the names of all the wounded, but all of them are doing well.-- Private Gus. A. Rhineheart, of the Richmond Sharp-Shooters, received a very severe wound on the top of the head by the bursting of a shell, and was insensible for three days, but he is improving rapidly.

ANOTHER ATTACK.

Some seem to think that the enemy will attack us again, and others that they will not: but should they call to see us, they will find us at home, better prepared to give them a specimen of Southern hospitality.

NED.


Richmond Daily Dispatch, 12 October 1861.

[ BACK TO EJOL ] UPLOADED: 24 DECEMBER 1996