DAILY DISPATCH.

VOL. XIX.--NO. 63. RICHMOND, VA., SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1861. PRICE ONCE CENT.

FROM THE NORTHWEST.

[SPECIAL CORRESPONDENCE OF THE DISPATCH.]


MONTEREY, Highland Co., Aug. 6.

The weather at present is very warm and oppressive, relieved occasionally by refreshing showers. There is some little sickness among the troops here, but the diseases readily yield to the power of medicine. Some deaths have occurred, which is to be expected among so many soldiers congregated together. The general health of the place is, however, considered good, which it is hoped may continue.

There has been no movement of troops since my last correspondence, save the arrival of a fine regiment of Georgians and a fine battery, the former of which were ordered to Huntersville, and the latter, with Shoemaker's Danville battery, are encamped near here. Colonel Fulkerson's splendid regiment is also here, as well as Colonel William C. Scott's command. The militia having been ordered out, large numbers are daily arriving and being formed into companies, and rapidly drilled in the science of war, some having received muskets and accoutrements. I notice two or three Cadets here, who are laboring hard to perfect the militia in military tactics.

Col. Wm. B. Taliaferro, of the 23d, is now commandant of this post, and by his skill and judgement has won the respect and esteem of all the troops under his command. His present position is one of responsibility and trouble, but everything goes on as smoothly as clock-work. The worthy and gentlemanly Adjutant of the 23d has been appointed Acting Adjutant-General, and most worthily fills the post. This leaves the 23d Regiment with but one of its staff officers, Major Jos. Pendleton, who, however irksome the duties, performs his part with an ability and assiduity entitled to all praise.

Since the capture of Dr. Carrington by the enemy we have had only one surgeon, (Dr. Dennis,) who has charge of the sick and wounded at McDowell, (ten miles from here), and has his hands full; but by kind attention he has succeeded in reducing the number of patients. Speaking of doctors, reminds me of two gallant and noble souls who deserve and do receive the thanks and gratitude of every man in the regiment. I allude to Capt. Walton, of the Keysville Guard, who, independent of his duties as commandant of his corps, has rendered most efficient service as a physical, not only to his own men, but to all who would call on him; and to Dr. T.S. Michaels, Lieutenant of the Goochland Greys, who has certainly had his hands full since our arrival in this part of the country. He is now, and has been for some time, acting as Adjutant of this regiment, which place he fills with great credit to himself, and also as surgeon and physician. Dr. M. is a native and resident of Henrico, and by his kind, gentlemanly and soldierly manner has gained the respect, confidence and esteem of all the regiment.

Nearly all the troops here have been furnished with tents and camp equipage, which is the first time since some of them have been in service that they have been thus equipped.

Much anxiety exists to hear the news from the East, and the papers are eagerly scanned whenever they can be brought from the Postmasters, to the deprivation of regular subscribers.

NED.


Richmond Daily Dispatch, 10 August 1861.

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